Data of a Written Off Vehicle

From 1st October 2017, the way in which UK vehicles are classified was amended. A brief statement can be found below. If you would like complete details of how vehicles are now classified in the UK visit The Official Association of British Insurers Code of Practice.

The first step is to understand the only direct route to revealing the ‘write-off’ data held again a vehicle is by purchasing a full UK vehicle history check. CarVeto offers this check at a cost of £12.50. CarVeto offers a free vehicle check but this displays limited information and does not display information obtained from the MIAFTR database.

Such data points are derived from the MIAFTR (Motor Insurance Fraud and Theft Register) and contain information and records provided by insurance firms as ‘written off’ UK vehicles.

 

Classifications Pre 1st October 2017

Prior to 1st October 2017, a written off the vehicle is classified as A, B, C or D.

Categorisation Summary

Category A – Total Loss (no salvageable parts)

Category B – Total Loss (some salvageable parts)

Category C – Vehicle suffered damaged but repairable (more severe than Category D).

Category D – Vehicle suffered damaged but repairable.

The definition of each category can be found in the below table:

Meaning of each categorisation

Category A

The vehicle has suffered extreme damage and the insurance company deemed the vehicle irreparable with little to no salvageable parts.

Category B

The vehicle has suffered significant damage and the insurance company deemed the vehicle irreparable but did have some salvageable parts.

Category C

This vehicle was deemed repairable, however, the cost of accident damage repair was greater than the value of the vehicle. For economic reasons, the insurance company chose to not repair the vehicle.

Category D

This vehicle was deemed repairable, however, the cost of repair was greater than the value of the car. For economic reasons the insurance company chose to not repair the vehicle.

Why an insurance company may not choose to repair the vehicle

Category A

The insurance company representative concluded damage to the vehicle was too extensive and deemed un-repairable. There is little to no salvageable parts.

Category B

The insurance company representative concluded damage to the vehicle was too extensive and deemed un-repairable. However, there is some value and salvageable parts.

Category C

The insurance company representative regarded the vehicle repairable, but the costs to repair were greater than the Pre Accident Damage Value of the vehicle. The Category C classification is not an indication that the vehicle is unroadworthy but the insurance company chose to not make a repair for economic reasons.

Category D

The insurance company representative regarded the vehicle repairable, but the costs to repair remained significant (more than 50% of the Pre Accident Damage Value). The Category D classification is not an indication that the vehicle is unroadworthy but the insurance company chose to not make a repair for economic reasons.

The scale of accident damage a vehicle may have suffered

Category A

This vehicle suffered extreme damage, for example, significant bodyshell, frame or chassis damage, water damage submerged, burnt out, fully destroyed. The insurance company, therefore, consider the vehicle to be of zero (NIL) value.

Category B

This vehicle suffered extreme damage, for example, significant bodyshell, frame or chassis damage, water damage submerged, burnt out, fully destroyed. The insurance company considers the vehicle to have some value as salvageable parts (a value of more than £50 is typical).

Category C

Classification Category C is more ambiguous and the levels of damage may vary considerably. For example, damage may be significant (not structural) on a vehicle that is relatively new. However, an older car may have suffered far less damage. Category C is regarded as an economical, constructed total loss classification. It means that the insurance company opted to not repair the vehicle for economic reasons.

Category D

Classification Category D levels of damage may vary significantly. Damage may be significant (not structural) on a vehicle that is relatively new. However, an older car may have suffered far less damage. A CAT D is regarded as an economical, constructed total loss classification. It means that the insurance company opted to not repair the vehicle for economic reasons.

Category Classifications After 1st October 2017

For vehicles written off after 1st October 2017, a classification of A, B, S or N is now allocated.

Summary
Category A – Total Loss (no salvageable parts)
Category B – Total Loss (some salvageable parts)
Category S – Vehicle has suffered damaged structurally, the vehicle is repairable
Category N – Vehicle has suffered damage, damage to the vehicle has been noted as NON-structural, the vehicle is repairable

The meaning of the newer category types

Category A (SCRAP)

The insurance company representative concluded vehicle damage that was beyond reasonable repair or deemed unusable. This vehicle is to be destroyed/crushed entirely.

This vehicle is unsuitable for repair and the entire vehicle including all of its parts must be crushed. Thereafter, the vehicle will be classed as waste.

Category B (BREAK)

The insurance company representative concluded vehicle damage that was beyond reasonable repair or deemed unusable.

This vehicle is unsuitable for repair but useable parts can be recycled. Thereafter, the vehicle will be classed as waste.

Category S (STRUCTURAL)

The insurance company representative has deemed the vehicle suitable for repair.

The vehicle is repairable, has sustained damage to any parts of the structural chassis and/or frame and the owner or insured driver has chosen to not repair the vehicle.

Category N (NON-STRUCTURAL)

The insurance company representative has deemed the vehicle suitable for repair.

The vehicle is repairable, has not sustained damage to any parts of the structural chassis and/or frame and the owner or insured driver has chosen to not repair the vehicle.

Although non-structural damage has been confirmed, critical items/parts may still need to be replaced. This includes items such as suspension and steering etc.

 

Stolen/Recovered Vehicle Data

The Police National Register records all UK vehicles reported as stolen alongside MIAFTR (Motor Insurance Fraud and Theft Register) provide the two sources of data for stolen and recovered vehicle data. Upon the insurance company reporting the vehicle as stolen a marker is placed against the vehicle via the MIAFTR database. This is similar to when a vehicle is recovered from theft but classified as an insurance total loss.

The type of loss

Theft/Stolen

A theft marker was recorded against the vehicle on the provided date although this does not mean the vehicle remains as stolen.

Category B (BREAK)

A theft marker was recorded against the vehicle but recovered on the provided date. Upon recovery of the vehicle, it was deemed as a total loss by the insurance company. For further information see the category descriptions.

Debt and Outstanding Finance Data

Any debt or outstanding finance datasets are highlighted when a vehicle has an existing finance agreement held against it. Should a vehicle carry a current financial agreement such as Personal Contract Purchase, Hire Purchase or Lease Agreement it is important to speak with the owner of the vehicle. Hire Purchase can be settled prior to buying the car. A CarVeto car check also provides details of the finance company that has a registered interest in the car along with contact details. This allows contact to be made to establish if the finance agreement has been paid off (settled) before purchase would be made.

Outstanding Finance Data is provided by Experian Ltd. Experian Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Experian Ltd is registered in England and Wales under company registration number 653331. Registered office address: The Sir John Peace Building, Experian Way, NG2 Business Park, Nottingham, NG80 1ZZ.

Vehicle Specification Data

All vehicle specification datapoints are sourced from DVLA (Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency). DVLA data provides core information toward the specification of a vehicle alongside various insights into its history (MOT – Ministry of Transport).

Examples of provided data within the set:

V5C Issue Date
Scrapped
Unscrapped
Plate Changes
Imported
Exported
Colour Changes

There are 47 provided data fields within the offered dataset. The DVLA bulk data-set information for more detail: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/bulk-data-set-information-for-vehicle-buyers

Fuel Economy and CO2 Emissions datasets

VCA http://www.dft.gov.uk/vca/ open fashion supplies this data with information including fuel economy, CO2 emissions, running costs of a vehicle and more. Licensed by the Open Government v3.0 for public information.

CarVeto compiles this information in an easy to read format with each Veto Check.

 

car fuel economy graph via VCA

Branch Recalls Data For Vehicle Safety

VCA also provides this dataset and contains Open Government License v3.0 public sector information license.

Manufacturer faults are recalled for a specific make, model or vehicle type. Such safety recalls should be repaired to avoid mechanical issues and to ensure road safety. This dataset carries information on vehicle makes and models impacted alongside issue descriptions that lead to manufacturer safety recalls.

 

Geo-Location Vehicle Crime Data

This dataset is provided by UK Police forces via an API directed by Police UK http://data.police.uk/data/ 

CarVeto provides customers a location field where a postal code, city, or street name is entered. Completing this field returns a geo map the displays the volume of vehicle crimes in the selected area.

Information shared includes location, date of crime and outcome.

MOT Datasets

This dataset is provided by DVSA (Driver Vehicle Standards Agency). Open Government License v3.0 public sector information license.

The dataset includes current and historic MOT test data including MOT advisory items/notices, passes and failures. This dataset reveals recorded mileage at the time of each test and supports the mileage verification process.

CarVeto

If you have questions or comments about the CarVeto glossary or our datasets please get in touch with us using our preferred channels.

The team at CarVeto.